Panels

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Conference Day 1 - Tuesday, December 8, 2020
Session 1
8:00am - 10:00am PST
Welcome & DOE Keynote Panel
Speakers: Chris Irwin, Erika Gupta, Alejandro Moreno
GWAC Foundational Session: Architecting a Resilient, Transactive Grid
Speakers: GWAC members
Session 2
10:30am - 12:00pm PST
Drivers of Change Workshop: Profound changes to our energy system are being driven by decarbonization, distributed systems, expansion of distributed energy resources, the advancement of related technologies, and now a global pandemic. What are primary drivers of change and where will they impact the future of an integrated grid at all scales? How big will the transformation be in the near and long term?
Moderators: Ron Cunningham, David Forfia
Presentations:Speakers:
What if We Build it and Nobody Comes?Hal T. Nelson, Portland State U.
Transactive Community Microgrids to Share Energy Storage Resources in PortugalPedro Moura, Univ of Coimbra
Pruning the tree, decarbonizing the grid by electrifying and reducing GHG one branch at a timeTanya Barham, GWAC member, Community Energy Labs
Session 3
12:30pm - 2:00pm PST
System Design & Architecture Workshop: What steps are needed to support the transition from a centralized to a decentralized grid based on highly coordinated self-optimization? How does the electric grid integrate with other infrastructures like water and gas through smart buildings and smart cities? How can Grid Architecture accelerate pragmatic action?
Moderators: Gerald Gray, Ron Bernstein
Presentations:Speakers:
Blockchain-Enabled Transactive Energy System DesignUmit Cali, NTNU
AI Standards for Transactive EnergyKen Wacks, Management and Engineering Consultant
Large Scale Simulation of a Regional Transactive Energy Marketplace ImplementationHayden Reeve, PNNL
Conference Day 2 - Wednesday, December 9, 2020
Session 1
8:00am - 9:30am PST
System Implementation Strategies & Examples Workshop:In recent years, a number of states, municipalities, utilities, NGO’s and corporations have engaged in putting transactive energy theory into practice around the globe. This topic will revisit some of these implementations, the lessons learned, and discuss the interdependence of the electric grid and the communication networks that are necessary to monitor and coordinate actions on the grid and how to build explicit, well-defined, trust models that define identity, authentication, service-level agreements, and privacy into TE systems.
Moderators: Aaron Snyder, Stuart McCafferty
Presentations:Speakers:
Price as a metric of Coordination in a Layered Decomposition Approach Trevor Gionet, Introspective Systems
A Game-Theory Based Analysis of the Effects of Energy-Storage System Utility Strategies on the Short-Term Energy MarketJeet Dhoriyani, LD College of Engineering & Renison Macwan, LD College of Engineering
Enabling Plug and Play Transactive Energy on Legacy Power GridsMichael Hammersley, Protocol Labs Research
Session 2
10:00am - 11:30am PST
Business Models and Value Realization Workshop: What does it take to create value for participants? How do different systems assign risk, cost and value to stakeholders? What do our transactive energy systems incentivize? Where should the focus be for the next transactive system implementations?
Moderators: Andrew Bordine, Leonard Tillman
Presentations:Speakers:
Reliability and Resilience Considerations for Transactive Energy SystemsFarrokh Rahimi, GWAC member, OATI
The Value of Forward Markets for Provision of Building Flexibility to the GridDavid Holmberg, NIST
Pricing Capacity - an application of Price Discrimination Strategies to Capacity Markets in the Context of DERSSumitrra Ganguli, PNNL
Session 3
12:00pm - 2:00pm PST
Virtual Poster Session with Live Chat
Conference Day 3- Thursday, December 10, 2020
Session 1
8:00am - 9:30am PST
Resilience Workshop: Some qualities of the power system by their nature improve the resilience of the system, and these qualities may be provided by transactive or non-transactive systems. What resilience benefits can a flexible and adaptive grid provide by incorporating transactive systems?
Moderators: Ron Ambrosio, Ron Melton
Presentations:Speakers:
Functional Form of Power System Resilience to Facilitate Transactive Energy Systems DesignSarmad Hanif, PNNL
Improving System Resiliency Using Transactive Mechanism for Distributed Black-StartBishnu Bhattarai, PNNL
Resilience and Opportunity at the Edge through TEToby Considine, Executive Director, Energy Mashup Lab
Session 2
10:00am - 11:30am PST
Regulatory and Policy Workshop: How do legislation and regulation support or limit transactive energy implementations today? What’s working well? What changes are needed and what should the industry do to encourage alignment of policy and regulatory measures to create a more flexible and interactive grid?
Moderators: Kay Aikin, Lorenzo Kristov
Presentations:Speakers:
The Need for a Regulatory Framework for Grid TransformationLorenzo Kristov, GWAC
Policy Planning for Cost Effective Grid Transformation in TE SystemsChris Nelson, South Dakota PUC
What Regulators Want from Grid Modernization and TE System ProposalsAbigail Anthony, Rhode Island PUC
Session 3
12:00pm - 2:00pm PST
Visions for Participation Workshop: A future grid will have many transactive systems and may include buildings, microgrids, campuses, smart cities and active residential participation. What models for participation will be possible and necessary?
Moderators: Tanya Barham, Lorenzo Kristov
Presentations:Speakers:
Integrating Economics into Transactive Energy's Theoretical FrameworkLynne Kiesling, Director, Institute for Regulatory Law & Economics at Carnegie Mellon University
TE Conceptual Model Mark Knight, 1898 & Co., part of Burns & McDonnell
The Energy Services Interface as a Transactive Interface for EV Grid Service ProvisionDavid Holmberg, NIST
Conference Closing SessionDavid Forfia, GWAC Chair

Transactive energy systems with a focus on the ongoing transformation to a participatory grid, including the following topical categories:

  • Drivers of Change – Profound changes to our energy system are being driven by decarbonization, distributed systems, expansion of distributed energy resources, the advancement of related technologies, and now a global pandemic.  What are primary drivers of change and where will they impact the future of an integrated grid at all scales? How big will the transformation be in the near and long term?
  • Business Models and Value Realization– What does it take to create value for participants? How do different systems assign risk, cost and value to stakeholders? What do our transactive energy systems incentivize? Where should the focus be for the next transactive system implementations?
  • Visions for Participation – A future grid will have many transactive systems and may include buildings, microgrids, campuses, smart cities and active residential participation. What models for participation will be possible and necessary?
  • Regulation and Policy– How do legislation and regulation support or limit transactive energy implementations today? What’s working well? What changes are needed and what should the industry do to encourage alignment of policy and regulatory measures to create a more flexible and interactive grid?
  • System Design and Architecture – What steps are needed to support the transition from a centralized to a decentralized grid based on highly coordinated self-optimization? How does the electric grid integrate with other infrastructures like water and gas through smart buildings and smart cities? How can Grid Architecture accelerate pragmatic action?
  • Resilience – Some qualities of the power system by their nature improve the resilience of the system, and these qualities may be provided by transactive or non-transactive systems. What resilience benefits can a flexible and adaptive grid provide by incorporating transactive systems?
  • System Implementation Strategies and Examples – In recent years, a number of states, municipalities, utilities, NGO’s and corporations have engaged in putting transactive energy theory into practice around the globe. This topic will revisit some of these implementations, the lessons learned, and discuss the interdependence of the electric grid and the communication networks that are necessary to monitor and coordinate actions on the grid and how to build explicit, well-defined, trust models that define identity, authentication, service-level agreements, and privacy into TE systems.